Dustin Poirier Explains What Went Right In Conor McGregor Rematch

Dustin Poirier has gone in-depth on how he was able to execute his game plan effectively against Conor McGregor.

Poirier shared the Octagon with McGregor on January 23. The lightweight tilt headlined UFC 257 in Abu Dhabi. While most agree that McGregor won the first round due to his accurate striking, Poirier was putting in work with his calf kicks. By the second round, McGregor’s lead leg was toast. Poirier was able to knock McGregor down in the second stanza and finished him via TKO.

Speaking to reporters during the UFC 257 post-fight press conference, Poirier gave credit to American Top Team coach Mike Brown for urging him to throw the calf kicks (via MMAFighting.com).

“Mike Brown was real big on me throwing calf kicks in this fight. Really big on it, and it worked. We compromised his leg and he was in bad position early, just from the repeated leg kicks.

“Even when he started checking, he wasn’t contacting with the shin, like a small rotation more, I would’ve been paying for those kicks, but I was still getting the muscle of his leg and that part of your leg and muscle is so small and thin that you can’t take many shots there. After the second leg kick, I knew he was hurting.”

Poirier went on to say that he sensed that McGregor was in pain due to the kicks and knew the damage would accumulate.

“I just know from experience how bad those things hurt. And I knew it was a five-round fight so it would only get worse. He started catching it and trying to counter it with his left hand towards the end, but I knew they were still landing. He was catching it after they were making contact. I knew that was still hurting him.”

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